THE SMART PREGNANT MOTHER IS EMPOWERED WITH INFORMATION

RESOURCES FOR EXPECTANT MOTHERS



The CDC’s Hear Her campaign seeks to raise awareness of potentially life-threatening warning signs during and after pregnancy and improve communication between patients and their healthcare providers.

 

“A woman knows her body. Listening and acting upon her concerns during or after pregnancy could save her life.”

— Dr. Wanda Barfield, Director of CDC’s Division of Reproductive Health



WHAT EVERY SMART MOTHER NEEDS TO KNOW ABOUT PRE-ECLAMPSIA

Pre-eclampsia is a condition that involves high blood pressure, swollen feet or ankles and protein in a pregnant woman. It can occur anytime after 20 weeks but usually develops in the third trimester and affects up to 7.5% of pregnant women worldwide. Click here for the free download: What Every Mother Needs to Know About Preeclampsia.

 

I'm passionate about preventing maternal deaths and the health of pregnant women, and I am honored to represent your unique point of view. 

DUE DATE CALCULATOR

PREGNANCY CALENDAR
Your pregnancy month to month



THE SMART MOTHER'S GUIDE TO A BETTER PREGNANCY

How to Minimize Risks, Avoid Complications, and Have a Healthy Baby

 

From conception to birth and beyond, this helpful guide teaches expectant mothers and fathers how to avoid preventable medical errors and have a successful childbirth experience.


The guide includes tips on how to investigate healthcare providers, what to insist on for a high-risk pregnancy, how to recognize and avoid labor-room problems, why “keepsake ultrasounds” are dangerous, how to cope with insurance companies that refuse procedures ordered by providers, and how to make a hospital accountable during admission.



FROM THE SMART MOTHER'S BLOG

A Thanksgiving Moment in the Labor Room

 

 

The full moon brought a downpour of babies that we could not catch fast enough in labor and delivery that hot summer night. I was sweaty, hungry, and tired. The air conditioner appeared not to be working yet again, which only added to my mounting frustration and foul mood.

  

Almost three decades ago, there were no computers where a resident physician could casually monitor patients remotely as they do now. Back in the day, you had to get up off your butt and physically examine a patient. Insert an IV. Write orders and be able to make a diagnosis correctly. 


Read More 0 Comments